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Diners’ hands dig into various dishes on a full table.
A full meal at McKiernan.
Two Food Photographers

The 38 Essential Restaurants in Montreal

A Sunday night taco omakase, grilled skewers at a Syrian tasting menu spot, tender Vietnamese beef wrapped in betel leaves, hand-pulled noodles at a buzzing Uyghur gem, and more of Montreal’s best meals

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A full meal at McKiernan.
| Two Food Photographers

“Where should I eat?” The Eater 38 hopes to answer that age-old question. This curated list offers a glimpse into Montreal’s thrilling food scene, home to an offbeat blend of poutine and pikliz. You’ll find Italian, Jewish, Vietnamese, and Haitian spots, and, of course, meaty French-leaning restaurants too. Together this ragtag bunch help make this city a standout place to eat. Spanning cuisines, neighborhoods, and price points, this guide is our shortlist of Montreal’s must-try spots, reflecting the new openings driving conversation, the trends playing out across dining tables, and the generational icons holding down their communities.

Updated, December 2023:

Winter can be a tricky time for Montreal’s restaurant scene. For many diners, it marks the unwelcome interruption of some of our most cherished ways to dine: hunkered down on a lively terrace or sprawled across an old, quilted picnic blanket with our favorite takeout. Except for the short holiday rush, winter also brings lulls for restaurant owners, who must try to lure patrons through the snow and sleet. But even in minus 30 degrees Celsius, Montreal’s food game stays strong. This update shines a light on warming dishes and welcoming spaces, with additions like ramen-slinging Yokato Yokaba, pho-ladeling Ho Guom, and sophisticated-yet-cozy Nora Gray to heat things up this winter.

We update this list quarterly to make sure it reflects the ever-changing Montreal dining scene.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process. If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Casse-Croûte Sissi & Paul

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Montreal brims with casual Haitian joints dishing juicy morsels of marinated-braised-then-fried pork known as griot — and everyone has their favorite. A frill-free, family-run takeout spot by D’Iberville metro station on Jean-Talon East, Sissi & Paul occupies a place in the top tier. Alongside outstanding griot, the restaurant offers lambi (conch stew), kibi (ground meat fritters), and all the necessary, no-nonsense fixings like fried plantains, pikliz, and djon djon rice.

Hélicoptère

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Combining a culinary approach that feels like fine dining with an atmosphere that’s casual and carefree, Hélicoptère has been capturing the best of both worlds since its launch in 2018. Prepare for an ever-changing menu of vibrant and creative plates marrying seasonal ingredients and international flavors, courtesy of chefs David Ollu and Marianne Lafleur. Recent highlights include a duck dish with pureed carrots, sea buckthorn, black garlic, and sake, and another combining bluefin tuna, corn, aji rico, and shishito peppers. Don’t overlook adjoining coffee shop Hélico and nearby sibling bakery Aube, two essential stops on any Hochelaga pilgrimage.

Chopped asparagus beneath a green sauce and layers of edible flowers and other fixings.
Asparagus at Hélicoptère.
Hélicoptère

Restaurant Ho Guom

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In comparing the city’s leading bowls of pho, diners’ preferences vary wildly. For some, Ho Guom’s nourishing chicken and lemon leaf option is unmatched, as are the beefy varieties topped with heaps of bean sprouts and fragrant herbs. But regulars at this quietly adored BYOB in Villeray will tell you other Northern Vietnamese specialties really take center stage. Consider the savory grilled beef wrapped in betel leaf, the fried fish patties, or the Hanoi-style grilled pork, all served with vermicelli and greens. Add an avocado smoothie or an order of chè ba màu (three-color bean dessert) for a sweet finish

A bowl of pho topped with herbs.
Pho at Ho Guom.
Restaurant Ho Guom

Restaurant Mastard

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Chef Simon Mathys is celebrated as one of the best in the business, having notably fine-tuned his craft at closed-but-not-forgotten Manitoba. At Mastard, the Rosemont restaurant Mathys opened in 2021, his devotion to local flora and fauna remains on full display with a smart, seasonal menu that’s surfaced dishes like carrots draped in creamed matsutake mushrooms and a sabayon of meat juices, or a colorful lettuce tart that made a splash online. A free-reining “carte blanche” menu comes in at $85 ($64 USD) for five courses, with the option for wine pairing. Note: Mastard operates Mondays to Fridays.

A slice of tomato covered in a rainbow of flowers in a pool of yellow sauce.
A dish at Mastard.
Philippe Richelet

Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up

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This Hochelaga hangout is the perfect after-dark counterpart to Mile End dépanneur-meets-sandwich-counter Le Pick Up. Since 2021, Resto-Bar Le Pick Up has been serving up laid-back vibes, blaring music, and some mean burgers in a rugged Ontario Street locale. A small menu delivers big flavors with must-try items like a juicy Nashville fried chicken sandwich, the ultimate crispy cilantro-garlic fries, and some killer house-made doughnuts. For drinking, there are some solid cocktails, natural wines, and beers from neighborhood brewers L’Espace Public. If you’re lucky enough to snag a burgundy booth on a Thursday, rejoice — it’s gin and oyster night.

An overloaded fried chicken sandwich, topped with various sliced vegetables.
Fried chicken sandwich.
Two Food Photographers

Mange Dans Mon Hood

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Smash burger joints have been cropping up all around town, but this Villeray spot commands attention. A classic casse-croûte reimagined with some West Coast flair, the concept originated in 2015, when chef Michel Lim first started flipping burgers out of his garage for a Restaurant Day pop-up. Today, he and partner Michel Nguyen (the two are childhood friends and the minds behind La Belle Tonki) draw crowds to an eclectic space that blends hip-hop culture and movie posters with a retro diner aesthetic. MDMH impresses with perfectly pressed patties, crisply caramelized at the edges, while Lim’s thinly cut fries, cooked in beef tallow, star in poutine and the Ol’ Dirty Fries: a mishmash with cheese sauce, house burger sauce, pickles, and onions.

A smash burger with cheese and pickles, on a tray with two bags of fries with various toppings.
Burger and fries at Mange Dans Mon Hood.
Mange Dans Mon Hood

Le Super Qualité

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La Petite-Patrie’s neon-lit South Indian street food restaurant consistently nails its tiffins (vegetarian and meat) and masala dosas, but pros know not to overlook its snacking fare. Try its delightful dahi batata puri, bite-sized shells filled with yogurt, tamarind chutney, and crispy sev; chickpea-battered okra; or the wada pav, a chutney-smothered potato patty stuffed into a small, cloud-like bun. With refreshing cocktails and a relaxed atmosphere, it’s great for a casual hang.

A pile of fried chicken pieces served on a leaf and topped with sliced red onion and lime wedges.
Chicken 65 at Le Super Qualité.
Marc-Antoine Charlebois

Restaurant Paloma

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Paloma is homey in a way few other Montreal restaurants can be; that’s because it’s run by a father-daughter duo (Armand and Rosalie Forcherio) who channel their family’s Niçoise and Italian heritage into the space and onto the plate. A tightly curated, regularly rotating menu showcases dishes like calf’s brains with lemon butter, tripe in tomato sauce, spaghetti carbonara, and the Ouistiti Cake, a delightful combination of hazelnut praline, chocolate ganache, and almond cake. Inside, diners will find a space that — despite its minimalistic approach — emanates comfort and coziness.

A plate of raviolis covered in deep brown sauce.
Raviolis at Paloma.
Dominique Lafond

Restaurant Moccione

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Nestled on a quiet stretch of Saint-Denis, this contemporary Italian spot hits all the right notes, and then some. It’s serving up seemingly simple yet eye-opening appetizers (like fried fish in sugo crudo and melt-in-your-mouth beef carpaccio), along with devastatingly delicious pasta dishes and a primo selection of cocktails and desserts. After the restaurant relocated to larger digs, it’s slightly easier to nab a table, though — be warned — reservations still fill up fairly quickly. For takeout that won’t disappoint, be sure to try nearby Moccione Pizza, owned by the same team.

Darna Bistroquet

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This snug La Petite-Patrie establishment takes the form of a small neighborhood bistro, yet exudes the warmth and flavors of North Africa. Aptly named Darna, translating to “home” in Arabic, it wears an effortless ambience: rattan light fixtures, an array of mismatched picture frames, pillow-lined seating. Dig into comforting dishes like sunchokes with roasted hazelnuts in a ras el hanout butter, a saffron-spiced chicken tagine with new potatoes and preserved lemon, herby falafel with house pickles and flaky rghaif, and vanilla panna cotta with poached pears in cardamom-saffron syrup. Open for Moroccan brunches on weekends, too.

A long dish of asparagus topped with halves of pink-dyed eggs and various herbs/garnishes.
Asparagus and eggs at Darna Bistroquet.
Darna Bistroquet

Montréal Plaza

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Many of the city’s fine dining, French-leaning, market-driven restaurants could earn a spot among Montreal’s top culinary destinations, but this raucous Plaza St-Hubert restaurant from Charles-Antoine Crête and Cheryl Johnson stands out for its whimsy. Dishes manage to be elegant and complex without being too serious, like foie gras terrine with apples, eel, and crabapple caramel, or one that combines blood pudding with lobster bisque and haskap berries in smoked duck fat. Cap off what is sure to be a memorable evening with Montréal Plaza’s trademark Crispy Fruit, a light dessert of berries, white chocolate mousse, sorbet, and slivers of dacquoise.

From the talents that brought standout curry shop Pumpui to Little Italy, this St-Hubert Street homerun also spotlights Thai flavors but in a more formal, wine bar-esque setting. Pichai’s menu is all about succulent Isan grilled meats and herby salads, including options like kor moo yang (spicy pork collar with iced greens), choo chee pla (grilled swordfish in red curry sauce), and laab ped (a minced duck salad with grilled duck hearts). An exquisite Thai tea-infused tiramisu coated in coconut, an exciting natural wine list, and daily specials round out the offering at Eater Montreal’s 2021 Restaurant of the Year.

Large cubes of tofu surrounding a pile of greens and peanuts, served beside bottles of wine.
Tofu thoke.
Matthew Perrin

Vin Mon Lapin

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Perennially packed, Mon Lapin is one of the hottest tables around, especially after earning the No. 1 spot on the Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list in 2023. The menu changes frequently, following the whims of chefs Marc-Olivier Frappier and Jessica Noël, but dependably spotlights farm-fresh veggies and seasonal seafood, including favorite items like the Croque-Pétoncle (a crisp scallop sandwich), leek conservas with chips, and a ​layered buckwheat cake. Reservations are strongly recommended.

From above, a tin of preserved leeks, served with chips.
Leek conservas and chips.
Dominique Lafond

Pizza Bouquet

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Owner André Theriault landed on something special when he began crafting pizzas from behind a counter tucked within bowling alley bar and LGBTQ hangout Notre Dame des Quilles on Beaubien Street. Now, the slice shop occupies its own space just across the street, allowing it to ramp up production. Available for takeout by the slice or the 16-inch round, Bouquet’s pizza reads as a sort of hybrid between New York, New Haven, and what the team calls “New Montreal.” Favorites include the Upside-Down (mozzarella below, garlicky tomato sauce and gremolata drops up top), the Soppressata (featuring Italian spicy salami, goat cheese, red onions, and honey), and specials like the Pickle Surprise with tangy dill pickles, red onions, mozzarella, and cream sauce. This spot gets busy, so if you need a full pie, call ahead.

A cook adds toppings to a pizza.
Prepping a pie at Pizza Bouquet.
Pizza Bouquet

Ma Poule Mouillée

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The quarter- or half-chicken plates — doused in spicy piri piri and served with a mountain of well-seasoned fries and a token salad — are the standard play at Portuguese grill Ma Poule Mouillée — though the poutine, bulked up with chicken, grilled chouriço, and São Jorge cheese, has achieved icon status. Some well-coordinated counter service ensures the wait isn’t too long, even if the queue of hungry locals and tourists often spills out the door and around the corner.

The crew behind Lawrence and Boucherie Lawrence found a sweet spot in 2016 with this easygoing, day-to-night cafe/wine bar. Larrys is open for an English-style breakfast at 9 a.m. all week (except Mondays), slinging scones with jam and clotted cream, roasted tomatoes, and a spectacular breakfast sandwich. Come nightfall, it’s all about the breadcrumb-topped mackerel spaghetti, albacore ceviche, beef tartare, and lovely seasonal veggie plates — and, of course, the wine. No reservations. No tipping.

Sausage, roasted tomato, and fried eggs.
Breakfast at Larrys.
Larrys

A pillar in Montreal’s dining scene, upscale Syrian restaurant Damas orchestrates a full-on sensory experience. From walnut-stuffed sea bass to a host of hefty char-grilled mains replete with sumac and Aleppo pepper, chef and owner Fuad Alneirabeie plates some absurdly delicious fare, using ingredients sourced both locally and from his native Syria. The 10-course tasting menu is a foolproof way to make the rounds, featuring multicolored mezze, fattoush salad, grilled octopus, and kibbeh nayyeh (a minty blend of raw lamb and beef). Damas’s ornate dining room is its own feast, adorned with countless lanterns, intricate patterns, and crimson hues. For something more grab-and-go, check out Folfol across the street, a street food takeout counter translating Damas flavors into sandwich form.

A hand holds skewers of meat over a ranging fire grill.
Shish taouk on the grill.
Damas

Kitano Shokudo

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Formerly known as Otto Bistro, this Japanese bistro in the Plateau neighborhood stands out for its mastery of raw fish (think sashimi, chirashi, nigiri, and maguro don), mazemen (brothless ramen with toppings like duck confit and burrata), and a variety of other finely tuned dishes from chef Hiroshi Kitano. A nondescript Mont-Royal Avenue spot with high tables and bar seating, Kitano Shokudo creates the kind of low-key and intimate atmosphere perfect for a casual date or a solo dining session.

Yokato Yokabai

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Yokato Yokabai thrives at the art of rich, creamy tonkotsu ramen (a specialty of Japan’s Hakata region) using organic ingredients. Aside from the signature pork bone-based broth, diners can take their pick of torikotsu (chicken), gomami (soy), and vegan options, each customizable in salt levels and toppings. Run by Kevin Fung, also known for Westmount’s long-standing Imadake izakaya, the ramen house shares a bustling space with Izakaya Ichigo Ichie. There are no reservations, so expect waits, especially during peak hours.

A bowl of ramen topped with slices of pork, egg, and greens, with a large wooden spoon set along the rim.
Ramen at Yokato Yokabai.
Yokato Yokabai

Alma Montreal

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Since 2018, this charming Outremont hideaway has wielded coastal Catalan flavors with such aplomb that diners may forget they’re in Montreal. These days, chef Juan Lopez Luna increasingly infuses his Mediterranean cooking with his Mexican roots, including nixtamalizing corn in house. The restaurant applies the new focus to its seafood-centric nine-course tasting menu, which also brims with organic vegetables, alongside an equally transportive wine list curated by Luna’s partner (in business and life), Lindsay Brennan. On Sunday nights, the duo hosts guest chefs for a collaborative taco omakase experience. If snagging a table at Alma proves challenging, fear not; sibling wine bar Tinc Set more than satisfies with tapas and Barcelona-style roasted chicken just next door.

A top-down view of a dish composed of edible flowers and other colorful ingredients.
A dish at Alma.
Alma

La Panzeria

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This Saint-Denis cafe is the closest you’ll get to an Apulian food experience without leaving Montreal. Follow the unassuming steps into this basement haunt, where the atmosphere is chatty and Southern Italian regional specialties are done right. Consider the focaccia Barese (gloriously topped with burrata, mortadella, and chopped pistachios), the panzerotto (small fried turnovers typical of the city of Bari), and the panino Polignano (a fried octopus sandwich), or ask about off-menu specials. A leader in Italian lunches, coffees, and snacks, La Panzeria also serves evening aperitivi on Thursdays and Fridays.

Focaccia topped with layers of mortadella, burrata, and chopped pistachios, presented in a cardboard takeout box.
Focaccia Barese.
La Panzeria

L'Express

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Founders opened L’Express on Saint-Denis in 1980 to cater to the area’s theater crowd, serving dependable French fare in a black-and-white-tiled dining room at nearly all hours. The bistro par excellence remains largely unchanged, and seats at the bar are more coveted than ever. Under chef Jean-François Vachon, who has helmed the kitchen since 2016, L’Express continues to uphold the classics with house standards like pistachio-speckled chicken liver pate, steak frites with shallot butter, and veal kidneys in mustard sauce.

Restaurant Miran

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Chef Abdul Samad’s restaurant is one of a small handful that proudly celebrate Uyghur cuisine in a city where it was once overlooked. Garnering some rightful attention, Miran presents a dizzying spread of grilled, stewed, braised, and skewered meats, though diners will also find comforting quail soup, delightfully chewy hand-pulled lagman noodles, and tandoor-baked samsa (meticulous pockets of dough stuffed with minced lamb and onions). The expansive Ville Saint-Laurent strip mall locale has seating for more than 100.

A man in chef clothes holds a large ladle moving food from a large pit oven.
Abdul Samad at Restaurant Miran serving samsa.
Christopher DeWolf

Patati Patata

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This slender casse-croûte has been dishing out one of Montreal’s go-to poutines for decades; the version here is a triumph of shoestring fries, delightfully squeaky cheese curds, flavor-packed veggie gravy, and a trademark solitary olive on top. Palm-sized hamburgers nestled in Portuguese powdered buns, satisfying breakfast sandwiches, and a popular filet of sole sandwich grace the menu behind the iconic, color-popping facade at the corner of Rachel and Saint-Laurent. Secure one of the coveted bar seats and witness the rhythm behind the counter as staff cater to the steady stream of patrons until 2 a.m.

Arepera

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This casual Venezuelan eatery excels at the traditional stuffed cornbread known as arepa. Arepera’s are filled with your choice from a (borderline overwhelming) array of beef, chicken, pork, fish, and veggie options, joined with fixings like avocado and plantains. You’ll also find empanadas, cassava fries, and pabellón, stewed and shredded beef served with rice and black beans. With a roomy Plateau locale, a menu that’s entirely gluten-free, and vegan choices available, it’s a no-brainer for a quick catch-up among friends with diverse dietary restrictions.

La Capital Tacos

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This taqueria thrives in Chinatown and has dinnerware to match the neighborhood. Opened in 2015 by partners from Mexico City and Monterrey, La Capital has cemented its reputation with some satisfying carnitas tacos, easy-drinking cocktails made with privately imported mezcal, and vegan options (such as a soy chorizo and potato quesadilla). Its quesabirria — a tortilla filled with tender beef, sealed shut with melted cheese, and served with a side of flavorful consomé — is a must. Service is friendly and swift, ensuring that even when there’s a queue, the wait won’t be excessively long.

Dobe & Andy

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Chinatown’s leading Hong Kong-style diner and barbecue joint is run by second-generation owners, the Ku brothers, in Saint-Urbain’s Place du Quartier. Since taking over from their father, they’ve made some tasty additions, like fried chicken, chile-garlic wontons, soy-lemon oxtail stew, wok-fried mushrooms with waffle fries, Cajun-style char siu gumbo, and mapo bolognese noodles (along with some sweet merch). Time-honored char siu pork, crispy roast pork, and roast duck served with an unforgettable ginger-scallion sauce remain headliners.

Place Carmin

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When it comes to the hallmarks of French brasserie dining, Place Carmin has it all taken care of. Think deviled egg canapes crowned with caviar, foie gras terrine with fruit compote, luxe seafood platters for two, and sirloin steak with Bernaise sauce. Leave room for dessert because award-winning pastry chef Léa Godin Beauchemin delivers: creme caramel, creme brulee, profiteroles, a Paris-brest made with hazelnuts and sea buckthorn fruit. A luminous space with warm woods and leathers, it is the latest from the creators of Quartier Latin stalwarts Bouillon Bilk and Le Cadet.

A two-level seafood tower with shrimp, oysters, and fixings.
Seafood tower at Place Carmin.
Two Food Photographers

Nora Gray

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An intimate dining room and savvy wine service set the tone for some seriously delicious Southern Italian fare at Nora Gray, a gem located at the crossroads of downtown, Little Burgundy, and Griffintown. Open since 2011 and bolstered by two acclaimed sister spots (Elena and Gia), it remains a top contender thanks to its thoughtful approach to pasta. Agnolotti filled with koginut squash, fontina, pearl onions, and kale; porcini cavatelli paired with Brussels sprouts, king oyster mushrooms, and Baluchon cheese; and other dishes seamlessly intertwine tradition with seasonal twists. Venture into the antipasti for potato schiacciata and deer tartare, or look to the secondi for offerings such as grilled sweetbreads and rib steak.

Snowdon Deli

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Looking for famed Montreal smoked meat without having to endure the snaking queues? Family-owned Snowdon Deli is a circa-1942 establishment that offers the city’s iconic smoked meat on mustard-smothered rye in addition to matzo ball soup, chopped liver, latkes, knishes, and blintzes — minus the wait time. Inside, expect a no-frills atmosphere where regulars squeeze into booths, chatter flows from behind the deli counter, and veteran employees ensure everything goes off without a hitch.

This reliable counter-service restaurant delivers some of Montreal’s very best shawarma, falafel, chicken, and beef kofta. Copious platters fill the menu, which also features some seriously delectable spreads (hummus, baba ghanoush, muhammara, and labneh). This Saint-Henri spot from ​​Raquel Zagury and David Bloom demands a slot on every Montreal food itinerary. Open Monday to Friday.

Boom J's Cuisine (multiple locations)

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This is the place to go for some superbly satisfying roti in Montreal; the menu features hearty options filled with juicy beef, chicken, curry goat, and more. Flaky patties and plates piled high with rice, plantains, and a variety of choices like jerk chicken, oxtail, and saltfish round out the offering. For tasty, thrifty Jamaican grub, head to Boom J’s original location in Pointe-Saint-Charles or its newer outpost in Ville-Émard.

Arthurs Nosh Bar

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It’s virtually impossible to fumble when ordering breakfast, brunch, or lunch at this Saint-Henri “nosh bar” — and everyone knows it. Perennially busy, Arthurs puts its stamp on Jewish deli classics, with raved-over schnitzel sandwiches, cloud-like syrniki (cottage cheese pancakes), a comprehensive latke smorgasbord, and towers of house-smoked salmon and bagels with all the accoutrements. Weekend brunch brings must-tries like Moroccan toast (poached egg, eggplant, spiced chickpeas, and tahini on challah) and the Grand Slam (crispy fried chicken, beef bacon, fried eggs, syrniki, and maple syrup). Arthurs doesn’t take reservations, so factor in some lengthy wait times; you won’t regret it.

A hand pours syrup over a stack of fried chicken, fried egg, and biscuit.
Brunch at Arthurs.
Arthurs Nosh Bar

Chalet Bar-B-Q

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With over three-quarters of a century to its name, this NDG landmark has won over the hearts of multiple generations enamored with its spit-roasted bird and its arguably unmatched dipping sauce. Open daily, the old-timey, wood-paneled Sherbrooke Street haunt is also known to serve a mean hot chicken, a traditional Québécois dish of chicken, sliced white bread, and peas, all soaked in gravy.

Entre-Deux

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It was a big deal for Montreal’s NDG neighborhood when a crew of young restaurateurs launched this buzzy wine bar on Sherbrooke Street West. Since 2021, they’ve been plating food that effortlessly adapts to the seasons and weaves a medley of flavors from around the world. 

Think: hamachi crudo with kimchi and leche de tigre, cacio e pepe roasted cauliflower, or chanterelle mushroom risotto with parm crumble and white truffle oil. The drinks match the vibe, with a rotating selection of natural wines that keeps things fresh and some well-executed cocktails — like a martini inspired by caprese salad — served from a mirrored bar nook behind a deep-green marble counter.

A bartender adds a skewer of olives to a drink in a martini glass.
A cocktail at Entre-Deux.
Entre-Deux

Restaurant Beba

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With this 2019 opening in Verdun, brothers Ari and Pablo Schor sought to recreate the delicious confluence of Spanish and Italian immigrant cultures from their native Argentina, complete with a few nods to their Jewish roots, too. Slip away from Promenade Wellington into Beba’s snug dining room for bright, seasonal seafood and salads, brilliantly boiled and braised meats and vegetables, and some lovely pasta dishes. Make sure to kick off the meal with whatever empanada is on offer and some potato knishes topped with caviar.

Three knishes on a plate topped with clumps of caviar, beside a bottle of wine.
Knishes with caviar.
Beba

McKiernan

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In a sprawling loft lined with wooden tables and string lights, McKiernan churns out hearty and heart-warming foods with understated refinement. Born from a tie-up between the Joe Beef crew and Derek Dammann (of now-closed Maison Publique), it’s a staple for rotisserie chicken and oversized schnitzels, but don’t overlook the pasta, sides, sweets, and daily specials. The vodka rosé rigatoni, Brussels sprouts with almonds and blue cheese, and seasonal doughnuts — like the rum and eggnog creation — are also much-loved at this Côte-Saint-Paul establishment.

A large, thin schnitzel topped with peppers and greens, served with sauces alongside a stein of beer.
Schnitzel at McKiernan.
Two Food Photographers

Marchigiani

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For over 60 years, locals have made a beeline for this family-run butcher and specialty shop out in Lasalle. Many tout the Italian sandwiches as some of the city’s finest. Marchigiani’s famed porchetta steals the show, but the offerings extend to chicken cutlet, sausage, meatball, and more. Keep the shop in mind for catering needs; impressive eight-foot sandwiches are up for order, alongside baked pastas, assorted salads, and snacks like arancini and stuffed olives.

Two halves of a sandwich displayed in checkerboard paper, stacked with sliced meats and vegetables.
One of the famed sandwiches at Marchigiani.
Marchigiani

Casse-Croûte Sissi & Paul

Montreal brims with casual Haitian joints dishing juicy morsels of marinated-braised-then-fried pork known as griot — and everyone has their favorite. A frill-free, family-run takeout spot by D’Iberville metro station on Jean-Talon East, Sissi & Paul occupies a place in the top tier. Alongside outstanding griot, the restaurant offers lambi (conch stew), kibi (ground meat fritters), and all the necessary, no-nonsense fixings like fried plantains, pikliz, and djon djon rice.

Hélicoptère

Combining a culinary approach that feels like fine dining with an atmosphere that’s casual and carefree, Hélicoptère has been capturing the best of both worlds since its launch in 2018. Prepare for an ever-changing menu of vibrant and creative plates marrying seasonal ingredients and international flavors, courtesy of chefs David Ollu and Marianne Lafleur. Recent highlights include a duck dish with pureed carrots, sea buckthorn, black garlic, and sake, and another combining bluefin tuna, corn, aji rico, and shishito peppers. Don’t overlook adjoining coffee shop Hélico and nearby sibling bakery Aube, two essential stops on any Hochelaga pilgrimage.

Chopped asparagus beneath a green sauce and layers of edible flowers and other fixings.
Asparagus at Hélicoptère.
Hélicoptère

Restaurant Ho Guom

In comparing the city’s leading bowls of pho, diners’ preferences vary wildly. For some, Ho Guom’s nourishing chicken and lemon leaf option is unmatched, as are the beefy varieties topped with heaps of bean sprouts and fragrant herbs. But regulars at this quietly adored BYOB in Villeray will tell you other Northern Vietnamese specialties really take center stage. Consider the savory grilled beef wrapped in betel leaf, the fried fish patties, or the Hanoi-style grilled pork, all served with vermicelli and greens. Add an avocado smoothie or an order of chè ba màu (three-color bean dessert) for a sweet finish

A bowl of pho topped with herbs.
Pho at Ho Guom.
Restaurant Ho Guom

Restaurant Mastard

Chef Simon Mathys is celebrated as one of the best in the business, having notably fine-tuned his craft at closed-but-not-forgotten Manitoba. At Mastard, the Rosemont restaurant Mathys opened in 2021, his devotion to local flora and fauna remains on full display with a smart, seasonal menu that’s surfaced dishes like carrots draped in creamed matsutake mushrooms and a sabayon of meat juices, or a colorful lettuce tart that made a splash online. A free-reining “carte blanche” menu comes in at $85 ($64 USD) for five courses, with the option for wine pairing. Note: Mastard operates Mondays to Fridays.